James Lester

AP Language & Composition, English III
English Department Chairperson
Clarksville High School
E-mail: james.lester@cmcss.net
Phone: (931) 648-5690

About Me

I truly love being a high school English teacher! I have been teaching for thirty-five years. I am originally from Clarksville and graduated from C.H.S. in 1977. I attended the University of Tennessee for my Bachelors degree. I earned my M.A. from Tennessee Tech and my Ph.D. from Georgia State University. I am also the author of Writing Research Papers, 16th edition, as well as a part-time instructor at Austin Peay State University. My son Caleb and his wife Jessica live in Georgia; they are the parents of my granddaughters Peyton who is nine years old and Paris who is two years old. My daughter Sarah lives in Roswell, Georgia with her husband Logan. Sarah is a medical recruiter for Jackson Healthcare. I am looking forward to a productive school year as we reach new heights of knowledge together. Go Wildcats!


AP Language & Composition



Course Objective ~ AP Language & Composition is a course that will strengthen the effectiveness of your writing skills. We will analyze and apply rhetorical strategies as we examine information from source texts. Moreover, we will employ techniques that for effective argument and the blending of sources into a composition. AP Language & Composition will also prompt you to become a critical reader of expository, argumentative, and analytical texts.

Expectations ~ During the school year, there will be structured tutorials held on four afternoons each month. These will be a time for enrichment activities as well as instruction and review of test-taking strategies. Additionally, there will be three Saturday Sessions held. These meetings will include all AP English students from C.H.S., Rossview High, and Northeast High. The designated Saturdays will include classroom instruction by special instructors. You are required to attend at least two of these sessions and will receive extra-credit for participating. There will also be a mock exam to be completed in the fall. The third requirement of the course is to take the AP Language & Composition Exam in early May. There is a fee for taking the test, but with a passing score, you will be reimbursed that money.

AP Language & Composition Test ~ The AP Language & Composition Test has two major parts:

Multiple Choice Section --- 60 minutes – 52 to 55 questions –

All reading comprehension – 3 or 4 essay passages

45% of the total AP Language test grade

Essay Section --- 15 minute reading period, then 2 hours to write – 3 total essays

1 – Synthesis – Mini-research paper – A documented paper using 4 sources!

2 – Analysis – Response to the PURPOSE of a prose essay and its use of rhetorical devices. “What is the meaning and how do you know it?"

3 – Persuasion / Definition / Explanation - Respond to a topic to explain your view with evidence from your readings, experience, or observation.

55% of the total AP Language test grade

Suggested Readings ~ The emphasis for this course is reading and analyzing nonfiction, informational text. However, we will also read several significant novels, plays, and short works of fiction and poetry. Following are some of the selections that will be emphasized during the AP Language & Composition course ~

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

Our Town by Thornton Wilder

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

"Thanatopsis" by William Cullen Bryant

Twelve Angry Men by Reginald Rose

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

"A Christmas Memory" by Truman Capote

Trifles by Susan Glaspell

Selected poems by Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

"The Quiet Man" by Maurice Walsh

Selected poems of Robert Frost

Tender Mercies by Horton Foote

Selected poems of Langston Hughes

The Piano Lesson by August Wilson

Selected short stories of Mark Twain



Instructor ~ Dr. Lester ~ E-mail - james.lester@cmcss.net




posted 8/8/2016 1:31:00 PM


English III Objectives and Course Content



English III Syllabus

Dr. James D. Lester, Jr.

2016 - 2017



As designated by the Tennessee State Board of Education, academic standards provide a common set of expectations for what students should know and be able to do at the end of a specific grade or course. For a breakdown of standard pacing and course objectives for English III students in the Clarksville Montgomery County School System, please visit the Curriculum Navigator on the CMCSS homepage found at: http://curriculum.cmcss.net/public/index.aspx



It is the policy of the Clarksville Montgomery County School System to follow the dictates of state statues in the selection and use of all instructional materials. Parents or legal guardians may request to review any instructional materials used in the classroom by their student by following the guideline set forth in Instructional Policy INS-A073, found at: http://www.cmcss.net/departments/instruction/departmentforms.aspx



The following outline charts the units of study for English III as well as major assignments that will be used to enhance student learning or solidify mastery of standards in each unit. This chart is an outline; hence, additional or different assignments may be created based on the needs of students. Specific details for major assignments will be shared with students and parents or legal guardians as the standards related to the assignments are addressed in class.



Textbook ~ The American Experience. Prentice Hall Publishers, 2007. Textbooks will not be assigned to students. They will be used for classroom readings.



Course Description ~ This course will consist of the English III curriculum as mandated by the local board of education. The emphasis for this course is on writing for real world situations and in response to informational texts. Writing tasks will include brief journal logs, whole essays, and research-based synthesis of multiple sources. Additionally, the literature of this course will be a survey of American Literature from the early Colonial Period to the Modern Period.





Unit 1 ~ Beginning Literacy Standards ~ Establishing the American Dream

Literature ~ The emphasis will be placed on informational texts such as speeches and historical documents – "A Gathering of Voices" – "Early National Literature" – Our Town by Thornton Wilder – Early National Foundational Texts and Speeches – The Crucible by Arthur Miller – “Captivity Narratives” as written by Mary Rowlandson and Captain John Smith – Writings and Maxims from the writings of Benjamin Franklin

Composition ~ Writing Process – Exploring, Planning, Drafting, Revising – Writing in Response to Informational Texts – Definition Essay – Explanatory Essay – Informational Writing – Defining and Using Rhetorical Devices in Writing

Vocabulary ~ Vocabulary will be studied in context as an integrated part of the reading.

Communication ~ Student-led collaborative groups – Peer Editing and Evaluation of Essays – Use of Media and Technology in Writing and Presentation

Evaluation ~ Item Samplers for each unit with multiple select responses – Evaluation of Writing Tasks in response for assigned and free response writings.





Unit 2 ~ Developing Literacy Standards ~ Reaching for the American Dream Literature ~ An emphasis will be placed on informational texts such as speeches and historical documents – "The Growing Nation" – "Westward Expansion" – Slave Narratives and the "Middle Passage" – Frederick Douglass – "Thanatopsis" by William Cullen Bryant – Shadows of Poe and Hawthorne – Transcendentalism ~ Emerson and Thoreau – Poetry of Dickenson and Whitman

Composition ~ Writing in Response to Informational Texts – Narrative Essay – Explanation – Informational Writing – Synthesis of multiple sources – Rhetoric and Analysis in Writing

Vocabulary ~ Vocabulary will be studied in context as an integrated part of the reading.

Communication ~ Student-led collaborative groups – Peer Editing and Evaluation of Essays – Use of Media and Technology in Writing and Presentation

Evaluation ~ Item Samplers for each unit with multiple select responses – Evaluation of Writing Tasks in response for assigned and free response writings.






posted 8/8/2016 1:30:00 PM


Unit 3 ~ Mastery of Literacy Standards ~ Courage of the American Dream

Literature ~ An emphasis will be placed on informational texts to prepare for the TN-Ready End-of-Course Exam – "Division, Reconciliation, and Expansion" – "Realism Poets" – Twelve Angry Men by Reginald Rose – "Trifles" by Susan Glaspell – American Humor and Mark Twain – The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Harlem Renaissance – African-American Literature

Composition ~ Writing in Response to Informational Texts – "Courage" Essay – Explanation – Informational Writing – Rhetoric and Analysis in Writing – Blending Sources

Vocabulary ~ Vocabulary will be studied in context as an integrated part of the reading.

Communication ~ Student-led collaborative groups – Peer Editing and Evaluation of Essays – Use of Media and Technology in Writing and Presentation

Evaluation ~ Item Samplers for each unit with multiple select responses – Evaluation of Writing Tasks in response for assigned and free response writings.





Unit 4 ~ Extension of Literacy Standards ~ The Dream Realized

Literature ~ An emphasis will be placed on informational texts to prepare for the TN-Ready End-of-Course Exam – "From Disillusion to Contentment" – "Modern Poets" – "Contemporary Writers" – The American Poet - Robert Frost – The Piano Lesson by August Wilson – African-American Literature – The Screenplay – Lyrics

Composition ~ Writing in Response to Informational Texts – Narrative Essay – Informational Writing – Argument – Explanatory Essay – Blending Sources – Synthesis Essay

Vocabulary ~ Vocabulary will be studied in context as an integrated part of the reading.

Communication ~ Student-led collaborative groups – Peer Editing and Evaluation of Essays – Use of Media and Technology in Writing and Presentation

Evaluation ~ Item Samplers for each unit with multiple select responses – Evaluation of Writing Tasks in response for assigned and free response writings.




posted 8/8/2016 1:25:00 PM


 

Classroom Expectations

1.  Enter the classroom with all required materials.

2.  Respect your classmates in your words & actions.

3.  Always listen when someone else is talking.

4.  Speak at appropriate times, using appropriate language.

5.  Follow the teacher’s directions and requests.