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CMCSS decision to go the extra thirty minutes

Please note: This article was originally published on 3/7/2014. Information and/or dates from past events may be not be relevant for the current school year.

The decision to go the extra thirty minutes to make up a day is based on the fact that students have missed five instructional days . Also, there is content that they will be expected to know on their end of year assessment the last week in April.  Even though they have gone the extra time, they will not have had exposure to that content on their assessment or would have missed out on some foundational knowledge for success at the next grade level.  That assessment counts 15% (elementary and middle) or 25% (high) of their second semester grade. We have no other days available to us to make up this time before the assessment.  Had we begun the makeup for an additional day, we would have had to begin next week and we knew that would not allow for families to make the needed schedule changes.  Saturdays become another inconvenience for families and we know families have already made plans for spring break and many have plans for April 18th.  In addition, all five days of spring break are not available as three of those days are scheduled as inservice days for teachers as a tradeoff for them doing those hours during the summer.  The Board can forgive the five days because they are stockpiled, but they have to weigh that against your child’s academic success.  Any decision we would make has its drawbacks, but the most important decision has to do with the student’s academic achievement.  There are many differing opinions on this matter as some parents want and need for their child to have access to the teacher as much time as possible, while others may feel they do not.  We sought the least disruptive option to all families while seeking the best for the students’ academic success. 


I hope this answers your question and helps you know that we understand your dilemma, but have your child’s success at heart.